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Cisco: Enterprise 802.11ac Sooner, Not Later

June 20 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Wireless - Cisco Wireless AP

 

The Wi-Fi giant surprises with an 802.11ac add-on to their popular high-end 3600 AP. Too soon? Perhaps not.

 

Cisco recently briefed me on an interesting product direction they discussed at their latest Cisco Live event, an add-on 802.11ac module for their popular 3600 series of Cisco APs. In addition to being one of the few four-antenna .11n products on the market, the 3600 has a modular architecture that enables the bolting on of additional functionality. Cisco previously announced a security monitor module for off-channel ClearnAir scanning, and the .11ac module will support 3x3:3 1.3 Gbps capability. Both modules are scheduled for availability in 1Q13, a little ahead of my prediction with respect to 802.11ac in the enterprise.802-11ac-wi-fi.jpeg

 

There is little doubt that the as-yet-unfinished 802.11ac standard will eventually supersede 802.11n. This will take many years - at a recent symposium I Chaired for the Boston Section of the IEEE Communications Society, the panel of analysts assembled pretty much settled on 2015 as the timeframe for critical mass for 802.11n in the enterprise - with one thinking it could in fact be much later than that. I'm expecting reasonable numbers of  enterprise-class .11ac products to appear in the second half of next year. As I noted above, I didn't expect an announcement to that effect so soon, and especially from industry leader Cisco. Aggressive? Certainly. But the evolution to .11ac is inevitable, and implementing the functionality in an add-on module eliminates the cannibalization risk that would otherwise be present. Indeed, such might actually spur sales of the 3600 as the technological risk is minimized.

 

The only risk, in fact, might be with respect to cost, as pricing for the module has not been announced. Nonetheless, the benefits of a modular implementations are once again reinforced, even if the assumed success of .11ac remains well off in the future.

Reading from http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/80833

More Cisco News:

Cisco’ Answer to SDN, Cisco ONE Introduced at Cisco Live

Cisco Unveils Mobile Visual Collaboration Tech in a Post-PC Era

 

Read more

How to Troubleshoot Cisco System's Wireless LAN Module

June 18 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Wireless - Cisco Wireless AP

The Cisco Wireless Services Module (WiSM) is part of the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller family. WiSM works with other Cisco appliances to deliver a wireless solution, which supports voice, wireless data and video applications. The Cisco WiSM integrates into the Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series Switch, a Cisco Catalyst 6500 Supervisor Engine 720 and a Cisco 7600 router. Troubleshooting the WiSM is required when the signals are not getting through to the router. The troubleshooting begins with the WiSM connection.

 How-to-Troubleshoot-Cisco-System-s-Wireless-LAN-Module.jpg

Things You Need as follows:

 

Steps to Troubleshoot Cisco System's Wireless LAN Module

1. Type "enable" to enter the privileged mode of the router or switch. The privilege mode will look like this "Router#"; it is the editor mode in which you enter router commands. This privileged editor mode is automatic. All of the troubleshooting commands will occur in privileged mode. For all of these commands, if there is a period at the end, ignore it.

 

2. Type the command "show version." It is the starting point of any troubleshooting. This displays information relating to the current configuration. One feature displayed is the IOS version running. The WiSM requires a Supervisor 720 on an IOS version 12.2(18). If it does not have 720, or the correct IOS version, there will be problems with the module.

 

3. Type"show module." Use this command to verify that the Cat6k has a WiSM card and the Supervisor 720 engine. It will also show the number of ports on the card.

 

4. Type "show wism status" to verify the location of the WiSM module. This information may be useful in locating other configurations on the module.

 

5. Type "show wism module 4 controller 2 status." This will verify the WiSM status. You will be looking for an "oper-up" information piece to verify the controller's operational status. The module 4 portion identifies the location of the slot in controller 2; it might be different.

 

6. Type "show interface trunk." This will verify that WiSM and VLANs have trunking defined. If you suspect that a problem is occurring with the VLAN, this would be your starting troubleshooting point.

 

7. Type"Show etherchannel load balance." This command will verify the correct load balance algorithm. The algorithm should be src-dst-ip. If this algorithm is not present, use the "port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip" command in config mode to reset it.

 

8. Type "show interface summary" to check the status of the configuration from the WiSM side. Here a summary view of the interface appears. You will see interface name, the port vlan id, the IP address, the type and the application manager.


More Notes: Troubleshoot and Configure Initial Wireless Services Module (WiSM) Setup

More Cisco Hardware Tips and Tutorials

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Cisco Projects 18-Fold Growth in Global Mobile Internet Data Traffic By 2016

June 14 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Networking

Mobile Cloud Traffic to Account for 71 Percent, or 7.6 Exabytes per Month, of Total Mobile Data Traffic by 2016, Compared to 45 Percent, or 269 Petabytes per Month, in 2011

 

According to the Cisco Visual Networking Index (VNI) Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast for 2011 to 2016, worldwide mobile data traffic will increase 18-fold over the next five years, reaching 10.8 exabytes per month — or an annual run rate of 130 exabytes — by 2016.mobiletraffic.jpg

 

The expected sharp increase in mobile traffic is due, in part, to a projected surge in the number of mobile Internet – connected devices, which will exceed the number of people on earth (2016 world population estimate of 7.3 billion; source: United Nations). During 2011−2016 Cisco anticipates that global mobile data traffic will outgrow global fixed data traffic by three times.

 

The forecast predicts an annual run rate of 130 exabytes of mobile data traffic, equivalent to:

33 billion DVDs.

4.3 quadrillion MP3 files (music/audio).

813 quadrillion short message service (SMS) text messages.

An exabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to 1 quintillion bytes.

 

This mobile data traffic increase represents a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 78 percent spanning the forecast period. The incremental amount of traffic being added to the mobile Internet between 2015 and 2016 alone is approximately three times the estimated size of the entire mobile Internet in 2012. The following trends are driving these significant increases:

 

1. More Streamed Content: With the consumer expectations increasingly requiring on-demand or streamed content versus simply downloaded content, mobile cloud traffic will increase, growing 28-fold from 2011 to 2016, a CAGR of 95 percent.

 

2. More Mobile Connections: There will be more than 10 billion mobile Internet-connected devices in 2016, including machine-to-machine (M2M) modules — exceeding the world’s projected population at that time of 7.3 billion. (One M2M application is the use of wireless networks to update digital billboards. This allows advertisers to display different messages based on time of day or day-of-week and allows quick global changes for messages, such as pricing changes for gasoline).

 

3. Enhanced Computing of Devices: Mobile devices are becoming more powerful and thus able to consume and generate more data traffic. Tablets are a prime example of this trend generating traffic levels that will grow 62-fold from 2011 to 2016 — the highest growth rate of any device category tracked in the forecast. The amount of mobile data traffic generated by tablets in 2016 (1 exabyte per month) will be four times the total amount of monthly global mobile data traffic in 2010 (237 petabytes per month).

 

4. Faster Mobile Speeds: Mobile network connection speed is a key enabler for mobile data traffic growth. More speed means more consumption, and Cisco projects mobile speeds (including 2G, 3G and 4G networks) to increase nine-fold from 2011 to 2016.

5. More Mobile Video: Mobile users want the best experiences they can have and that generally means mobile video, which will comprise 71 percent of all mobile data traffic by 2016.

 

The Cisco study also projects that 71 percent of all smartphones and tablets (1.6 billion) could be capable of connecting to an Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) mobile network by 2016. From a broader perspective, 39 percent of all global mobile devices (more than 4 billion), could be IPv6-capable by 2016.

 

Impact of Mobile Devices/Connections

a. The increasing number of wireless devices and nodes accessing mobile networks worldwide is the primary contributor to traffic growth. By 2016, there will be more than 8 billion handheld or personal mobile-ready devices and nearly 2 billion machine-to-machine connections, such as GPS systems in cars, asset tracking systems in shipping and manufacturing sectors and medical applications for making patient records more readily available.

 

b. Smartphones, laptops and other portable devices will drive about 90 percent of global mobile data traffic by 2016.

 

c. M2M traffic will represent 5 percent of 2016 global mobile data traffic while residential broadband mobile gateways will account for the remaining 5 percent of global mobile data traffic.

---Original resources from m2mworldnews.com


More Cisco News:

Cisco Unveils Mobile Visual Collaboration Tech in a Post-PC Era

Cisco: What Mobile Internet Traffic Will Look Like by 2016?

Read more

Cisco Buying Tips: Cisco UCS Server

June 12 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Switches - Cisco Firewall

When Cisco came out with its Unified Compute System (UCS) blades a couple of years back, there was plenty of skepticism about how the company would do by venturing into the pastures new of the server landscape. Last month's announcement that the company passed the 10,000 customer milestone for UCS sales laid many of those doubts to rest.

 

With IDC rating blades as the fastest growing server segment during the next several years, this bodes well for Cisco's growing presence in the marketplace.

 

"We're hearing from customers who are reporting all-in savings in the range of 40 percent on the cost of computing," said Todd Brannon, senior manager, Data Center and Virtualization, Cisco. "The savings stem from a variety of sources: lower capex as the platform efficiently scales, reduced administrator time, density/power savings and reduced software licensing costs as more workload lands on fewer servers."

 

One customer told Brannon he could let his CTO take a Cisco blade straight out of the box, insert it into a chassis slot, and as the system identified and integrated the new resource into the available pool, they congratulated him on his first server deployment.

CISCO-ucs_b200m2jpg.jpg

New Cisco UCS Blades

Since our last snapshot around two years ago, Cisco server blade releases have been largely in lock step with the roll-out of Intel Xeon processor roadmap. Two years ago, the company released the Cisco UCS B200 M1 and B250 M1 blades, which are based on the Intel Xeon processor 5500 series. In the past year, it introduced the Cisco UCS B200 M2 and B250 M2, both based on the Intel Xeon Processor 5600 series.

 

The UCS B200 blade server is a half-width, 2-socket blade server with up to 192 GB of memory. It can deliver substantial throughput and scalability.

 

The Cisco UCS B250 M2 Extended Memory Blade Server is aimed at maximizing performance and capacity for demanding virtualization and large dataset applications. It is a full-width, 2-socket blade server that supports up to 384 GB of memory.

 

In addition, the Cisco UCS B230 M2 and B440 M2 blade servers are based on the Intel Xeon processor E7 family. These two servers are follow-on models to earlier-released M1 versions that were based on the Intel Xeon Processor 7500 series

 

The Cisco UCS B230 M2 Blade Server is a two-socket server supporting up to 20 cores and 512 GB of memory. The B230 M2 extends the capabilities of the Cisco Unified Computing System by delivering higher levels of performance, efficiency and reliability in a more compact, half-width form factor.

 

The UCS B440 M2 is a 4-socket blade that can support up to 40 cores and 512GB of memory. It is best for enterprise-class applications.

 

"We will continue to roll out blades targeted at both infrastructure and enterprise-class applications," said Brannon. "Last year, we delivered nine benchmarking world records at the launch of the Intel Xeon processor E7 family."

 

Cisco UCS Racks

Cisco offers more than just blades. It also provides a range of UCS rack servers. Much like it has done with blades, Cisco has transitioned the rackmount servers from M1 to M2 models to support the newest Intel Xeon Processor 5600 or E7 family.

 

The Cisco UCS C200 M2 and UCS B210 M2 servers are high-density, 2-socket rackmount servers built for production-level network infrastructure, web services, and mainstream data center, branch and remote-office applications. The Cisco UCS C250 M2 server is a high-performance, memory-intensive, 2-socket, 2-rack unit (RU) rackmount server designed for virtualization and large dataset workloads.

 

Two rackmount servers use the Intel Xeon processor E7 family. The Cisco UCS C260 M2 Rack-Mount Server is a high-density, 2-socket platform that offers compact performance for enterprise-critical applications. The C260 M2 server's maximum 1TB of memory and 16 drives make it good for memory-bound or disk-intensive applications.

 

The Cisco UCS C460 M2 Rack-Mount Server has enough processing power, memory and local storage to house mission-critical applications, as well as server consolidation of resource-intense workloads.

 

"Cisco UCS is a next-generation data center server platform that unites compute, network, storage access and virtualization into a cohesive system designed to outperform previous server architectures, increase operational agility and flexibility while potentially dramatically reducing overall data center costs," said Brannon. "The system is programmable using single point, model-based management to simplify and speed deployment of applications and services running in bare-metal, virtualized, and cloud-computing environments."

---Reading from serverwatch.com

 

More Related Cisco UCS news:

Fusion-io, Its ioMemory Coming to Cisco UCS Blade Servers

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Full Reviews on Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router

June 8 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Routers

Quick Look at Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router

Pros: Easy to set up. Detailed management interface. IPv6 ready. Supports VLANs. Gigabit Ethernet.

Cons: Sluggish interface. Web filtering rules are too basic. Can't tell when VPN users are connected. Confusing VPN setup.Cisco-RV180-small-business-router.jpg

Bottom Line: The Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router offers security-conscious small businesses an all-in-one box to set up VPN access for remote employees, basic routing, wireless, and firewall. It's also future-proof, supporting IPv6 by default.

 

The Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router ($246 MSRP) makes it easy to set up a firewall, a VPN server, a router, and a wireless network with a single, compact box. The company also offers the RV180 ($182), with all the same features minus the wireless network. The RV180W addresses a lot of the things that were missing in the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, such as increasing the number of VPN users supported and adding Gigabit Ethernet ports.

 

The RV180W aims to offer security, remote access and simple configuration. Even though Cisco is marketing this dual-band wireless router as a small business product, it is comparable to some of the higher-end consumer routers tested recently, such as theNetgear N900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router WNDR4500 and AirStation Nfiniti High PowerGiga Wireless-N Router & Access Point from Buffalo Technology. Pricewise, the RV180W is comparable to Netgear's N900, although it has more features in common with Buffalo's AirStation line of routers.

 

Hardware Specifications
The Cisco RV180W has one WAN port for Internet connectivity and four Gigabit LAN ports in the back. There are two external antennas on the back for wireless networking. Square and compact, it measures 1.18” x 5.91” x 5.91” (HWD) and weighs a mere 0.61 lbs.

 

The glossy front panel has indicator lights for power, wireless activity, Internet connectivity, and for each of the four LAN ports. The front panel also has an AP indicator that lights up steady green when the router is being used as an access point. The Bridge indicator is green when it is acting as a bridge.

 

The back panel has a power button, a reset button to reboot the router or to restore factory settings, and a port to plug in the AC power cable. Unlike the previous RV110W, the four LAN ports on the back of the RV180W support Gigabit Ethernet. While Gigabit Ethernet is not yet a must-have on most business routers, the increasing number of applications, file-sharing, and video streaming within the office make it a should-have.

 

Features
Like the earlier RV110W, the R180W would be attractive to many businesses because of its built-in VPN server. Considering how expensive and time-consuming it can be to deploy a VPN server for remote workers to connect and access office printers, databases, and applications, a router with built-in VPN is a bargain. The RV180W supports both the widely-supported PPTP and QuickVPN protocols and allows up to 10 VPN connections at time. This is an improvement over the RV110W, which supported only five users at a time.

 

Cisco upgraded the RV180W to broadcast on both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz-band and included WDS bridging/repeating and WEP/WPA/WPA2 consumer and Enterprise wireless security. The router can also be configured to broadcast on four VLAN-based SSIDs. Businesses would appreciate the various options available for setting up the wireless network.

 

The well-organized Web interface is chock-full of firewall and routing options, including port forwarding, firewall access rules, quality of service, and creating VPN user accounts.

 

The RV180W supports IPv6 out of the box, making it a sound investment for any business planning to upgrade their networks to adopt the newer Internet address standard down the road. Businesses should pay careful attention to make sure new equipment have IPv6 support, or the eventual transition is going to be really painful.

 

Cisco Quick Start
Setting up the RV180W was a snap, as I followed the enclosed printed Quick Start Guide to connect the router to the computer and to the network. When I opened up the Web interface with the default IP address and login credentials, the Setup Wizard launched automatically. The entire process took less than 10 minutes, and included setting up security on the wireless network, changing the password for the default account, configuring the router's WAN gateway settings, and testing to make sure I had Internet connectivity. Plenty of on-screen tips and explanations were available at every step.


I also had the option to configure the router to broadcast a different MAC address. Many ISPs secure customer connections by locking the IP address to a specific hardware MAC address to prevent someone from swapping routers or firewalls without the administrator's knowledge. The RV180W can broadcast the MAC address of the computer being used to run the Setup Wizard, or an entirely different address (such as the previous router being replaced).


I appreciated the Setup Wizard's focus on security. The interface warned me when I selected a password that wasn't strong enough and defaulted to a secure wireless setup by default. When I tried to set up an open wireless network, the wizard displayed several warnings.

 

More Related Topic:

Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router Data Sheet

Review on Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall

Read more

Tutorial: Cisco Catalyst 3560 Switch Interfaces Configuration

June 4 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Switches - Cisco Firewall

It is important to understand how to access switch ports. The 3550 switch uses the type slot/port command, just like a 2621 router and just like the 3550 switch. For example, Fastethernet 0/3 is 10/100BaseT port 3.

The 3550 switch type slot/port command can be used with either the interface command or the show command. The interface command allows you to set interface specific configurations. The 3550 switch has only one slot: zero (0), just like the 1900.

Network Layout: Work with the saved network that you used to configure devices in lab 8.27.

3550A.gif

 

Lab Steps

1. To configure an interface on a 3550 switch, go to global configuration mode and use the interface command as shown.

3550A#config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CTRL/Z

3550A(config)#interface ?

   Async              Async interface

   BVI                Bridge-Group Virtual Interface

   Dialer             Dialer interface

   FastEthernet       FastEthernet IEEE 802.3

   Group-Async        Async Group interface

   Lex                Lex interface

   Loopback           Loopback interface

   Multilink          Multilink-group interface

   Null               Null interface

   Port-channel       Ethernet Channel of interfaces

   Transparent        Transparent interface

   Tunnel             Tunnel interface

   Virtual-Template   Virtual Template interface

   Virtual-TokenRing  Virtual TokenRing

   Vlan               Catalyst Vlans

   fcpa               Fiber Channel

   range              interface range command

   3550A(config)#interface

 

2. The next output asks for the slot. Since the 3550 switch is not modular, there is only one slot, which is 0, although it lists 0-2 for some odd reason. However, you can only type in “0” as the slot in this program. Any other slot number will give you an error. The next output gives us a slash (/) to separate the slot/port configuration.

3550A(config)#interface fastethernet ?

  <0-2>  FastEthernet interface number

3550A(config)#interface fastethernet 0?

/

3550A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/?

  <0-12>  FastEthernet interface number

 

3. After the 0/configuration command, the above output shows the amount of ports you can configure. The output below shows the completed command.

3550A(config)#interface fastethernet 0/4

3550A(config-if)#

 

4. Once you are in interface configuration mode, the prompt changes to (config-if). After you are at the interface prompt, you can use the help commands to see the available commands.

3550A(config-if)#?

Interface configuration commands:

      arp                 Set arp type (arpa, probe, snap) or timeout

      bandwidth           Set bandwidth informational parameter

      carrier-delay       Specify delay for interface transitions

      cdp                 CDP interface subcommands

      channel-group       Etherchannel/port bundling configuration

      default             Set a command to its defaults

      delay               Specify interface throughput delay

      description         Interface specific description

      dot1x               IEEE 802.1X subsystem

      duplex              Configure duplex operation.

      exit                Exit from interface configuration mode

      help                Description of the interactive help system

      hold-queue          Set hold queue depth

      ip                  Interface Internet Protocol config commands

      keepalive           Enable keepalive

      load-interval       Specify interval for load calculation for an interface

      logging             Configure logging for interface

      mac-address         Manually set interface MAC address

      mls                 mls interface commands

      mvr                 MVR per port configuration

      no                  Negate a command or set its defaults

      ntp                 Configure NTP

   --More--  

You can switch between interface configurations by using the int fa 0/# command at any time from global configuration mode.

 

5. Let’s look at the duplex and speed configurations for a switch port.

3550A(config-if)#exit

3550A(config)#int fa0/4

3550A(config-if)#duplex ?

  auto  Enable AUTO duplex configuration

  full  Force full duplex operation

  half  Force half-duplex operation

3550A(config-if)#

3550A(config-if)#speed?
   10    Force 10 Mbps operation
100   Force 100 Mbps operation
auto  Enable AUTO speed configuration
3550A(config-if)#

 

6. Since the switch port’s duplex and speed settings are already set to auto by default, you do not need to change the switch port settings. It is recommended that you allow the switch port to auto negotiate speed and duplex settings in most situations. In a rare situation, when it is required to manually set the speed and duplex of a switch port, you can use the following configuration.

3550A(config-if)#speed 100

Duplex will not be set until speed is set to non-auto value

3550A(config-if)#duplex full

full duplex - transmission of data in two directions simultaneously. It has a higher throughput than half duplex.

There are no collision domains with this setting

Both sides must have the capability of being set to full duplex

Both sides of the connection must be configured with full duplex

Each side transmits and receives at full bandwidth in both directions

 

7. Notice in the above command that to run full duplex, you must set the speed to non-auto value.

 

8. In addition to the duplex and speed commands that can be configured on the switch port, you also can turn on what is called portfast. The portfast command allows a switch port to come up quickly. Typically a switch port waits 50 seconds for spanning-tree to go through its"gotta make sure there are no loops!" cycle. However, if you turn port fast on, then you better be sure you do not create a physical loop on the switch network. A spanning tree loop can severely hurt or bring your network down.    Here is how you would enable port fast on a switch port.

3550A(config-if)#spanning-tree ?

  bpdufilter     Don't send or receive BPDUs on this interface

  bpduguard      Don't accept BPDUs on this interface

  cost           Change an interface's spanning tree port path cost

  guard          Change an interface's spanning tree guard mode

  link-type      Specify a link type for spanning tree protocol use

  port-priority  Change an interface's spanning tree port priority

  portfast       Enable an interface to move directly to forwarding on link up

  stack-port     Enable stack port

  vlan           VLAN Switch Spanning Tree

 

9. The command above shows the available options for the spanning-tree command. We want to use the portfast command.

3550A(config-if)#spanning-tree portfast

%Warning: portfast should only be enabled on ports connected to a single

 host. Connecting hubs, concentrators, switches, bridges, etc... to this

 interface  when portfast is enabled, can cause temporary bridging loops.

 Use with CAUTION

%Portfast has been configured on FastEthernet0/4 but will only

 have effect when the interface is in a non-trunking mode.

3550A(config-if)#

 

10. Notice the message the switch provides when enabling portfast. Although it seems like the command did not take effect, as long as the port is in access mode (discussed in a minute), the port will now be in portfast mode.

 

11. After you make any changes you want to the interfaces, you can view the different interfaces with the show interface command. The switch output below shows the command used to view a 10/100BaseT interface on the 3550 switch.

3550A(config-if)#ctrl+z

3550A#sh int f0/4

FastEthernet0/4 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is Fast Ethernet, address is 00b0.c5e4.e2cf (bia 00b0.c5e4.e2cf)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Full duplex, 100Mb/s
  input flow-control is off, output flow-control is off
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input never, output 1w6d, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue :0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     1 packets input, 64 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     1 packets output, 64 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 3 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 PAUSE output
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

3550A#

 

12. In addition to the show interface command, you can use the show running-config command to see the interface configuration as well.

3550A#sh run

[output cut]

interface FastEthernet0/3
  switchport mode dynamic desirable
!
interface FastEthernet0/4
  switchport mode dynamic desirable
  spanning-tree portfast
!
interface FastEthernet0/5

[output cut]

 

13. You can administratively set a name for each interface on the 3550 switch. Like the hostname, the descriptions are only locally significant. For the 3550 series switch, use the description command. You can use spaces with the description command, but you can use underlines if you need to.

 

To set the descriptions, you need to be in interface configuration mode. From interface configuration mode, use the description command to describe each interface.

3550A#config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CTRL/Z

3550A(config)#int fa 0/4

3550A(config-if)#description Marketing VLAN

3550A(config-if)#int fa 0/10

3550A(config-if)#description trunk to Building 3

3550A(config-if)#

In the configuration example above, we set the description on both port 4 and 10.

 

14. Once you have configured the descriptions you want on each interface, you can then view the descriptions with either the show interface command, or show running-configcommand. View the configuration of the Ethernet interface 0/9 by using the show interface ethernet 0/4 command.

3550A(config-if)#ctrl+z

3550A#sh int  fa 0/4

FastEthernet0/4 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Fast Ethernet, address is 00b0.1a09.2097 (bia 00b0.1a09.2097)
Description: Marketing VLAN

(output cut)

 

15. Use the show running-config command to view the interface configurations as well.

3550A#sh run

[output cut]

!

interface FastEthernet0/4
description "Marketing VLAN"
duplex full
speed 100
spanning-tree portfast

!

[output cut]

Notice in the above switch output that the sh int fa0/4 command and the show run command both show the description command set on an interface.

 ---Original reading at content.digiex.net

More Cisco 3560 Tutorials and Tips:

How to Configure Interfaces for the 3560 Switch?

How to Configure the Cisco Catalyst 3560 Series Switches?

Video Offer: Cisco Catalyst 3560 and 3750 QoS Simplified

How to Save/Keep the Cisco 3560 Switch Configuration?

Why Should We Care about Cisco 3560-E Series Switches

Read more

Cisco 8-port Switch Series Simplifies Campus Network Design

May 31 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Switches - Cisco Firewall

When an enterprise needs more network ports in a conference room or an extra jack for a printer in an office, a network administrator has traditionally had very few good choices. There was the expensive option of pulling more cables from the wiring closet, or the option of plugging in an unmanaged 8-port switch from a low-cost vendor into an existing port, complicating campus network design.

Cisco-8-port-Switch-Series-copy-1.jpg

Now that port shortage problem has reached beyond the conference room as enterprises of all kinds  are adding a multitude of IP devices and stretching the edge of the LAN beyond the wiring closet. Companies now deploy large numbers of IP phones and video surveillance cameras, schools have more computers and IP-based instructional technology and retail shops have deployed more IP-connected kiosks and point-of-sales stations. While 802.11n wireless LAN technology and cheap unmanaged switches have mitigated the port shortage to some extent, a better answer may lie in enterprise-class compact switches.

Cisco Systems unveiled a new family of compact switches targeting this problem. The switches are part of the Catalyst C-Series and consist of the Catalyst 2960-C and the 3560-C. There are five models and 8 to 12 Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) ports with dual GbE uplinks. These switches do not require their own power source since each device has a new Power-over-Ethernet (PoE+) "pass-through" feature, which allows them to be powered by an upstream closet switch. They are then in turn able to pass the PoE power downstream to IP-connected devices like phones and cameras.

The Catalyst C switches also have many enterprise-class features that low-cost switches lack, such as auto-configuration, IPv6 acceleration and access control lists (ACL). They also have several features central to Cisco's broader Borderless Networks architecture, including Cisco security functions, TrustSec and the IEEE standard MACSec, and Cisco's EnergyWise energy management. The product compares somewhat to a port extender released by Extreme Networks in 2009, the ReachNXT 100-8t port extender, an 8-port device.

For Jordan Martin, technical services manager at a Pennsylvania-based healthcare enterprise, an enterprise-class 8-port switch would simplify his campus network design.

"We have all kinds of little, unmanaged switches lying around places where there just aren't enough jacks to facilitate what we need. Unfortunately a lot of our wiring in our building was done without a ton of forethought,” Martin said.

"We have a campus here with a guard shack and we need to be able to process fiber in and Ethernet out, so we need a decent capability switch out there. But I don't want to spend $3,000 for one guy with a computer and a phone."

Using unmanaged switches from a low-cost vendor has been adequate at times within his network, but such devices don’t scale well, Martin said. Replacing them with enterprise-class 8-port switches could improve operations, management and visibility into the edge of his network.

"In a non-managed switch, if you're having trouble with a device, it could be the switch; it could be the cabling. Being able to take a look at the interface and see if it's a duplex mismatch or whatever the issue may be without having to go out to the location and put some tap on the line… That remote diagnostic capability of an enterprise switch is big for us."

Campus network design: Even with good forethought you'll need the occasional 8-port switch

Eric Steel, network engineer with Georgia-based law firm Constangy, Brooks & Smith, said he usually avoids the need for switches beyond the wiring closet by planning ahead and making sure he has plenty of ports across the network.

"But in those cases where we can't, we end up putting in a cheap mini-switch -- Linksys or Netgear," he said. "

Those switches bring various operational challenges. Steel has to properly configure them for spanning tree protocol so that they don't loop into the LAN, and getting power to the device is also a frequent challenge. "Security is, of course, another headache, because you now have some open ports for people to plug into accidentally or maliciously," Steel said.

Replacing an unmanaged 8-port switch with compact enterprise-class switches allows users to have a network management and security feature set from the core to the edge, said Mike Spanbauer, principal analyst with Current Analysis.

"It offers the ability for the end user to basically standardize on a specific security configuration or software image," he said. "And if they have Catalyst 3560s in the closet and these 3560-Cs remotely deployed in a conference room, which offers the ability to simplify management."

These compact switches also give new campus network design options to enterprises with large numbers of small branches or locations with a light network footprint.

The Catalyst C switches replace a collection of older 8-port Fast Ethernet Catalyst 2960 switches which lacked the Borderless Networks capabilities, memory, PoE pass-through and dual uplinks of these new models.

---Original news from searchnetworking.techtarget.com

More Cisco Catalyst Switch Tips and Cisco Switch Info:

How to Choose the Right Cisco Switches for Your LAN?

Layer 2 Switches & Layer 3 switches

Cisco Catalyst 2960 LAN Base Series & Catalyst 2960 LAN Lite Series

Cisco Launches New Industrial Switches-Cisco IE 2000 Series

Cisco Catalyst 6500 Switches Vs. Catalyst 4500 Series

Read more

Full Reviews on Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router

May 28 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Routers

Pros: Easy to set up. Detailed management interface. IPv6 ready. Supports VLANs. Gigabit Ethernet.

Cons: Sluggish interface. Web filtering rules are too basic. Can't tell when VPN users are connected. Confusing VPN setup.

Bottom Line: The Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router offers security-conscious small businesses an all-in-one box to set up VPN access for remote employees, basic routing, wireless, and firewall. It's also future-proof, supporting IPv6 by default.

Cisco-RV180W.jpg

The Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction Router ($246 MSRP) makes it easy to set up a firewall, a VPN server, a router, and a wireless network with a single, compact box. The company also offers the RV180 ($182), with all the same features minus the wireless network. The RV180W addresses a lot of the things that were missing in the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, such as increasing the number of VPN users supported and adding Gigabit Ethernet ports.

The RV180W aims to offer security, remote access and simple configuration. Even though Cisco is marketing this dual-band wireless router as a small business product, it is comparable to some of the higher-end consumer routers tested recently, such as theNetgear N900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router WNDR4500 and AirStation Nfiniti High PowerGiga Wireless-N Router & Access Point from Buffalo Technology. Pricewise, the RV180W is comparable to Netgear's N900, although it has more features in common with Buffalo's AirStation line of routers.

Hardware Specifications
The Cisco RV180W has one WAN port for Internet connectivity and four Gigabit LAN ports in the back. There are two external antennas on the back for wireless networking. Square and compact, it measures 1.18” x 5.91” x 5.91” (HWD) and weighs a mere 0.61 lbs.

The glossy front panel has indicator lights for power, wireless activity, Internet connectivity, and for each of the four LAN ports. The front panel also has an AP indicator that lights up steady green when the router is being used as an access point. The Bridge indicator is green when it is acting as a bridge.

The back panel has a power button, a reset button to reboot the router or to restore factory settings, and a port to plug in the AC power cable. Unlike the previous RV110W, the four LAN ports on the back of the RV180W support Gigabit Ethernet. While Gigabit Ethernet is not yet a must-have on most business routers, the increasing number of applications, file-sharing, and video streaming within the office make it a should-have.

Features
Like the earlier RV110W, the R180W would be attractive to many businesses because of its built-in VPN server. Considering how expensive and time-consuming it can be to deploy a VPN server for remote workers to connect and access office printers, databases, and applications, a router with built-in VPN is a bargain. The RV180W supports both the widely-supported PPTP and QuickVPN protocols and allows up to 10 VPN connections at time. This is an improvement over the RV110W, which supported only five users at a time.

Cisco upgraded the RV180W to broadcast on both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz-band and included WDS bridging/repeating and WEP/WPA/WPA2 consumer and Enterprise wireless security. The router can also be configured to broadcast on four VLAN-based SSIDs. Businesses would appreciate the various options available for setting up the wireless network.

The well-organized Web interface is chock-full of firewall and routing options, including port forwarding, firewall access rules, quality of service, and creating VPN user accounts.

The RV180W supports IPv6 out of the box, making it a sound investment for any business planning to upgrade their networks to adopt the newer Internet address standard down the road. Businesses should pay careful attention to make sure new equipment have IPv6 support, or the eventual transition is going to be really painful.

Cisco Quick Start
Setting up the RV180W was a snap, as I followed the enclosed printed Quick Start Guide to connect the router to the computer and to the network. When I opened up the Web interface with the default IP address and login credentials, the Setup Wizard launched automatically. The entire process took less than 10 minutes, and included setting up security on the wireless network, changing the password for the default account, configuring the router's WAN gateway settings, and testing to make sure I had Internet connectivity. Plenty of on-screen tips and explanations were available at every step.

I also had the option to configure the router to broadcast a different MAC address. Many ISPs secure customer connections by locking the IP address to a specific hardware MAC address to prevent someone from swapping routers or firewalls without the administrator's knowledge. The RV180W can broadcast the MAC address of the computer being used to run the Setup Wizard, or an entirely different address (such as the previous router being replaced).

I appreciated the Setup Wizard's focus on security. The interface warned me when I selected a password that wasn't strong enough and defaulted to a secure wireless setup by default. When I tried to set up an open wireless network, the wizard displayed several warnings.

More Related Topic:

Cisco RV180W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router Data Sheet

Review on Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall


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Network Switch Compared: Cisco Catalyst 3750 Series or Juniper EX4200

May 23 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Switches - Cisco Firewall

 

Juniper EX4200 or Cisco Catalyst 3750 Series Switch Compared

What do people thought about Juniper's EX switches Vs. Cisco Catalysts switches? Someone may answer like these: “Well the Juniper switches are much cheaper, that's for sure. I don't understand this Cisco-only mentality that's out there - why would I pay 3 or 4 times as much for a switch with less features?”. “We bought the Blade Network Technologies Rack Switches. Juniper OEM them, but they are even cheaper buying them from BNT. And the suppport is great too.”…

Right, Both Cisco and Juniper have many users and followers. Not the better, but the right. There are some comparison between Juniper’s EX4200 switch and Cisco’s 3750 series Catalyst switches, which may help you know more about EX4200 switch and Cisco 3750 switches.

 

EX4200 vs. Catalyst 3750: Layer 3 Stackable Switch Comparison

With prices starting at under $4,000, Juniper’s EX4200 line is available in 24 and 48 port 10/100/1000 densities, both PoE and non-PoE. They also include either 1Gb or 10Gb modular uplink connectivity. Another cool feature is the standard hot swap power supplies, while most of Cisco 3750 switches come with a single non field serviceable power supply.

Cisco 3750G, CISCO 3750E, and Cisco Catalyst 3750X switches come in over 70 different models and it can be overwhelming figuring out exactly what model to order without having to go through a myriad of technical, feature and pricing comparisons. Juniper makes it easy, offering one model with the same or better performance in several categories than all of Cisco 3750 series switches. Better yet, Juniper’s J-Care support can be as much as 75% less than Cisco’s Smartnet.

One of the most important factors in choosing a Layer 3 stackable switch is the actual performance of the stack. An independent study found Juniper’s EX4200 Latency is always lower when the switches are in a Virtual Chassis configuration. Coincidently enough, Cisco doesn’t publish latency rates of their stackable solution. Virtual Chassis configurations recover from hardware and software failures in milliseconds and operate at 30-Gbit/s rates in each direction between switches.

So in a side by side comparison between the Juniper EX4200 and the Cisco 3750G, E or X, it was no contest. 

Price and Specs of Juniper EX 4200, Cisco 3750G, Cisco 3750-E, Cisco 3750-X

 

EX4200

3750G

3750-E

3750-X

Example List prices

$10,800
(48 port 10/100/1000 + 4 SFP model)

$13,995
(48 port 10/100/1000 + 4 SFP model)

$18,995
(48 port 10/100/1000 + 2 X2 model)

$12,000
(48 port 10/100/1000 + 4 SFP model)

1 Yr 24x7x4 Support List Prices

$895

$1,611

$2,432

$1,120

Bandwidth (Gbps)

136

32

160

160

Throughput (Mpps)

101

38.7

101.2

101.2

Stacking Throughput (Gbps)

128

32

64

64

Max switches in virtual stack

10

9

9

9

L3 RIP and Static

YES

YES

YES

YES

IPv6

YES

YES
(requres license)*

YES

YES

IPv4 unicast/multicast

YES

YES

YES

YES

Wire Speed

YES

YES

YES

YES

10-GBE Scalable

YES

NO

YES

YES

Internal power capabilities

Redundant Hot Swappable

NON-Field Replaceable

Single Field Replaceable

Redundant Hot Swappable

 

More PDF files: Juniper Networks EX Series/ Cisco Catalyst Interoperability Test Results

Cisco 3750 Guide: CISCO Catalyst 3750 Family

How to Configure a Cisco 3750

 

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Cisco's Wireless Unit Shifts Emphasis to "Mobility"

May 22 2012 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco News

Cisco's Wireless Networking Business Unit doesn't actually talk so much about wireless networking these days. Increasingly, its message aimed at IT groups is about the broader concept of "mobility."
Cisco-s-Wireless-Unit-Shifts-Emphasis-to-Mobility.jpg
The change, not only for Cisco but its rivals, reflects the fact that mobile workers are no longer focused simply on replacing an Ethernet cable with a Wi-Fi signal and being able to carry their corporate laptop to the conference room. The real question has become: what can they, and the company, and the company's customers, now do once they've made that replacement?

"Connecting a device to my corporate network is just step one. The question is: what happens after that?" says Sujai Hajela, vice president/general manager of Cisco's wireless networking business unit, who spoke with Network World this week regarding Cisco's announcement of three new pre-tested bundles of products and services designed to cut through the confusing complexity of enterprise mobility.

The new Smart Solutions packages are by themselves not exactly new: they're formed of existing Cisco hardware and software, third-party partnerships, and consulting services from Cisco or its partners. But Cisco says they represent a shift in the company's thinking about how to deploy mobile technology for businesses. Instead of a grab bag of separate products, the new approach sees mobility, in effect, as a whole that's greater than the sum of its many parts, including devices, operating systems, apps, Wi-Fi access points, VPNs, authentication and security. The overarching enterprise benefit, according to Cisco, is summed up in a new term, "Cisco Unified Workspace."

BACKGROUNDCisco mobility bundles target BYOD, mobile virtual desktop

"Enterprises are looking at the next generation of users coming into their ranks," says Tim Zimmerman, principal analyst for network services and infrastructure with market watcher Gartner. "Most of them don't even know what an RJ-45 plug is. The iPad doesn't even have one. There's a presumption of wireless connectivity [being available anywhere, anytime]. That puts more responsibility on IT organizations to manage that."

Cisco's main challenge in the enterprise market, he says, is execution and optimization - in effect, turning PowerPoint slides of talking points into concrete capabilities that enterprises buy into and then buy to mobilize business.

Cisco still dominates the enterprise wireless LAN landscape, but its dominance is less complete than it was a few years ago. By revenues, Cisco's share of the total worldwide market for enterprise WLAN equipment is now about 50%, down from the more than 60% it commanded for years, according to IDC. Its nearest rival, publicly held Aruba Networks, finally broke into a double-digit share of global revenues only last year, capturing 11.5% according to IDC.

Cisco continues to invest heavily in radio frequency technologies, leveraging its own Wi-Fi chip designs with Cisco-developed, on-chip code to boost signal reliability and consistency, and throughput. The focus is less on raw chip-level data rates, though that's important, and more on optimizing the connection to provide the reliability, security and throughput of a wired Ethernet link.

Cisco's Hajela, who formerly ran Motorola's WLAN group and came over to his current job at Cisco in August 2011, sometimes sounds like a network version of Dr. Phil. "More and more of our messaging is about customer 'care-abouts,'" he says at one point. And at another point, "The end user is looking for an uncompromised experience, regardless of the network" connectivity.

These bromides actually mean something, and Hajela becomes specific and insistent when pressed. "The network doesn't matter to the user," he says. "What he wants is to be able to use his app wherever he is."

And that use must be optimal. "If my device and my network connection support high-def video, then I should get high-def video," he says. "And if I'm using a smartphone, I should get optimal battery life. These things should be handled by intelligence placed in the network."

Cisco's job is to cram more and more intelligence into the networks and applications and infrastructure that supports the enterprise's mobile users and mobile business.

"What's really resonating with enterprise IT is this: the system looks at who the user is, and what he's trying to do, rather than how he's connecting" by wire or wireless, Hajela says.

Cisco's Identity Services Engine (ISE) is a key part of this approach, identifying and authenticating users regardless of how they connect, and adjusting their access and security privileges based on variables such as their location, connectivity, and time of day. [See "Cisco enterprise management tools take on new network realities".] Tightly integrated with ISE is Cisco Prime Network Control System (NCS), which replaced the standalone Wireless Control System management application for Cisco WLANs, and creates single console for managing both wired and wireless.

The need for such an approach "just plain makes sense," commented Network World wireless blogger Craig Mathias in a post about NCS. "Along with [unified] security and integrity comes a fundamental need to handle the ever-increasing capacity demanded by an ever-growing population of wireless users with equally-demanding applications," he wrote. "A single-pane management console adds convenience, lowers cost (Cisco points out that generalists with the right tools can be just as productive as more-expensive specialists), and just plain makes sense...."

Cisco isn't the only WLAN supplier taking this unifying or converging approach, as Gartner's Zimmerman points out. "We see this in HP, in Aruba, which is now offering a [LAN] switch along with end-to-end, multivendor support," he says. "Vendors are addressing the multiple elements within this infrastructure layer."

The reality is that Cisco faces a rapidly changing enterprise mobile environment, and enterprise customers have plenty of options. Earlier this month, Aruba announced that Texas A&M University, a major Cisco shop, is replacing its existing Cisco WLAN with Aruba's products, after extensive testing. The school will eventually install 6,000 to 7,000 Aruba 802.11n access points, along with Aruba's AirWave wired/wireless network management application.

---Original reading appeared in networkworld.com

 

More Cisco Wireless News and Info:

Simple Ways to Secure Wireless Network

WMC2012: Cisco Bridges Wi-Fi, Cellular Nets

Read more
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