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Cisco ASA FirePOWER Services Sizing

June 30 2017 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Switches - Cisco Firewall, #Networking, #IT, #Technology

It is really important that you understand the capabilities of each Cisco ASA model before you select the one that is appropriate for your specific deployment.

The following Table lists the maximum application visibility and control (AVC) and NGIPS throughput on each Cisco ASA–supported model.

Table.The Maximum Concurrent Connections and AVC/NGIPS Throughput

ASA Model

Maximum Concurrent Connections

Maximum AVC and NGIPS Throughput

ASA 5506-X (with Security Plus license)

50,000

125 Mbps

ASA 5506W-X (with Security Plus license)

50,000

125 Mbps

ASA 5506H-X (with Security Plus license)

50,000

125 Mbps

ASA 5508-X

100,000

250 Mbps

ASA 5512-X (with Security Plus license)

100,000

150 Mbps

ASA 5515-X

250,000

250 Mbps

ASA 5516-X

250,000

450 Mbps

ASA 5525-X

500,000

650 Mbps

ASA 5545-X

750,000

1,000 Mbps

ASA 5555-X

1,000,000

1,250 Mbps

ASA 5585-X with SSP10

500,000

2 Gbps

ASA 5585-X with SSP20

1,000,000

3.5 Gbps

ASA 5585-X with SSP40

1,800,000

6 Gbps

ASA 5585-X with SSP60

4,000,000

10 Gbps

For a complete and up-to-date Cisco ASA model comparison, visit Cisco’s ASA website, at cisco.com/go/asa.

Reference from http://www.ciscopress.com/articles/article.asp?p=2730336&seqNum=4

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FAQ for the Cisco 860 and 880 Migration

June 23 2017 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Cisco Routers, #Networking, #IT, #Cisco & Cisco Network

When you choose to migrate to the new Cisco 860 and 880 Series routers, what features and performance you should know? In the following part, we summarize several questions and answers for the Cisco 860 and 880 Series Integrated Services Routers helping you migrate to new Cisco 860 and 880 Series options smoothly.

 

Q. What is the platform power consumption for the C881W, C886W, and C887W?

A. Please refer to the following Table for platform power consumptions for the C881W, C886W, and C887W.

C881W, C886W, and C887W Platform Power Consumption

Product Part Number

Power consumption without PoE

Power Consumption with PoE

C881W

12W

48W

C886W

22W

58W

C887W

22W

58W

Q. What is the performance with services for Cisco 860 and 880 Series ISRs?

A. The performance with services for Cisco 860 Series ISRs is 4 Mbps, and the performance with services for Cisco 880 Series ISRs is 8 Mbps.

Q. What are the default memory and memory upgrade options for Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series ISRs?

A. Please refer to Table below for default memory and memory upgrade options for Cisco 860VAE, 880W, and 880G Series ISRs.

Default Memory and Memory Upgrade Options for Cisco 860VAE, 880W, and 880G

Product Part Number

Default Memory DRAM

Memory Upgrade Option

CISCO860VAE

256 MB

None

C880W

512 MB

None

C880G

512 MB

1 GB (max)

Q. What PoE daughter card does the C880 ISR use?

A. The C880 ISR uses a 30W 2-port PoE daughter card that is directly powered from the 12-VDC power supply of the host motherboard. It replaces the 4-port daughter card formerly used on Cisco 880 Series routers, which required a separate external -48-VDC power supply. No separate external -48-VDC power supply is required on C880 Series routers.

Q. How many PoE ports are supported on C880W Series ISRs?

A. C880W Series ISRs support 2 ports with PoE on Fast Ethernet 0 and Fast Ethernet 1. They are 802.3af-complaint, and they support 15.4W per port.

Q. Can I use the PoE daughter card from Cisco 880 Series ISRs on the C880W Series ISRs?

A. The PoE daughter card used on Cisco 880 Series routers cannot be used on C880W routers. Even though they have the same connector to the motherboard, they have different power specifications. The PoE daughter card used on Cisco 880 Series routers requires a separate external -48-VDC power supply, whereas the PoE daughter card on the C880W takes power directly from the motherboard, and no separate external power supply is required.

Q. Do the Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series ISRs support Cisco Virtual Office?

A. Cisco Virtual Office is supported on C880W and C880G Series ISRs. The license with part number CVO800-CFG is required during the ordering process. Cisco 860VAE Series routers do not support Cisco Virtual Office at this time.

Q. Do Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series ISRs support Cisco Wide Area Application Service Express (Cisco WAAS Express)?

A. Please refer to following Table for Cisco WAAS Express support on Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series routers.

Cisco WAAS Express Support on Cisco 860VAE, 880W, and 880G Routers

Product Part Number

Cisco WAAS Express Optimized Bandwidth

Maximum TCP Connections

Cisco WAAS Express Features

CISCO860VAE

Not supported

-

-

C880W

1.5 Mbps

30

Lite feature (No DRE, CIFS, SSL, or HTTPS)

C880G

1.5 Mbps

75

Full featured

Q. Do Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series ISRs support Cisco ScanSafe?

A. Cisco 860VAE, C880W, and C880G Series ISRs support the Cisco ScanSafe connector in any universal Cisco IOS Software images with security feature set (SEC) licenses. The connector securely redirects HTTP and Secure HTTP (HTTPS) traffic. There is no need for client or agent software to be installed on each laptop or desktop, so any routers anywhere in your network can act as a secure managed cloud security gateway. Cisco ScanSafe allows easy deployment with no additional hardware and can integrate into any proxy server configuration.

Q. What are the maximum-transmission-unit (MTU) sizes for different DSL interfaces on Cisco 860 and 880 Series ISRs?

A. Please refer to Table below for MTU sizes for different DSL interfaces on Cisco 860VAE and 880 Series ISRs.

MTU Sizes for Different DSL Interfaces on Cisco 860VAE and 880 Series Routers

Product Part Number

MTU for ATM Mode (bytes)

MTU for PTM Mode (bytes)

MTU for ATM or EFM Mode (bytes)

CISCO860VAE

2038

2038

-

CISCO887VA/CISCO886VA

C887VA/C886VA

1530

1600

-

C888EA

-

-

1940

Q. What are the MTU sizes for different Ethernet interfaces on Cisco 880 Series ISRs?

A. Please refer to the following Table for MTU sizes for different Ethernet interfaces on Cisco 860VAE and 880 Series ISRs.

MTU Sizes for Different Ethernet Interfaces on Cisco 860VAE and 880 Series Routers

Product Part Number

MTU for Fast Ethernet Layer 2 Ports (bytes)

MTU for Gigabit Ethernet Layer 2 Ports (bytes)

MTU for Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet Layer 3 Ports (bytes)

CISCO860VAE

1518

1518

4075

CISCO880 series/C880 series

1600

-

9216

Q. What new 3G plus DSL models are available in C880 Series ISRs?

A. Four new 3G plus DSL models are available: C886VAG, C887VAG, C887VAMG, and C888EG. Please refer to the data sheet “Cisco 880G Series Integrated Services Router with Embedded 3.7G” for more details.

Q. What cellular modems are integrated in the C880G Series ISRs?

A. There are two different types of carriers. One type supports third-generation Partner Project (3GPP) HSPA+, HSPA, Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS), Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution (EDGE), and General Packet Radio Service (GPRS), and the other supports 3GPP2 EVDO RevA/Rev0 and 1xRTT. Two cellular modems support 3GPP2: MC8705 and MC8795V, and one cellular modem supports 3GPP2: MC5728V.

Q. What is the cellular modem form factor in C880G Series ISRs?

A. The external 3G ExpressCard socket on Cisco 880G Series routers has been replaced by an internal PCIe mini-card slot on C880G Series routers. The external ExpressCard modems, therefore, have been replaced by the internal PCIe mini-card cellular modems.

Q. What is the function of the mini-USB port in C880G Series ISRs?

A. C880G Series routers have a mini-USB type B port that enables the modem to be connected to a PC and run PC-based modem provisioning and the carrier customization tool.

Q. Do the C880G Series ISRs support the Diagnostic Monitoring (DM) port?

A. C880G Series routers have removed the Diagnostic Monitoring port from the chassis front faceplate. The remote Diagnostic Monitoring function is required to collect the modem Diagnostic Monitoring log.

Q. Do the C880G Series ISRs support the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA)?

A. C880G Series routers support NMEA. A virtual serial port is implemented to export NMEA format GPS data to external NEMA 2.0-compliant user applications.

Q. How do I configure NMEA on C880G Series ISRs?

A. To enable NMEA GPS data streaming, C880G Series routers have introduced two new command-line interfaces (CLIs): cdma|gsm gps modem standalone and cdma|gsm gps nmea. A virtual serial port has been implemented in the Cisco IOS Software to export NMEA-formatted GPS data. If end users connect the router to a Microsoft Windows-based PC through an Ethernet connection COM port emulation software is required on the PC side to emulate the COM port over the Ethernet link.

Q. What NMEA sentences do the C880G Series ISRs support?

A. C880G cellular modems support the following NMEA sentences: GGA, GSA, GSV, RMC, and VTG.

Q. How many SIM card slots do the C880G Series ISRs support?

A. C880G Series routers support two SIM card slots, which allow cellular modem failover to the secondary SIM card to continue service when the modem loses services to the primary SIM card.

Please refer to the Cisco 819 Integrated Service Router Q&A and “ Configuring Cisco EHWIC and 880G for 3.7G (HSPA+)/3.5G (HSPA)” for more information about how to use and configure dual-SIM.

Q. Is dual-SIM supported on CDMA 3GPP2 based C880G Series ISRs?

A. C880G CDMA 3GPP2 Series routers do not support the SIM card; therefore, the dual-SIM feature is not supported on these routers.

Q. How do I send, display, delete, and archive SMS on C880G Series ISRs?

A. C880G Series routers have an SMS function that enables the routers to send and receive SMS messages. This feature also enables the routers to save and store the SMS messages in an FTP server. SMS is enabled by default. You can send, display, delete, and archive SMS through the router CLI.

Q. Is encapsulation ppp supported by C880G Plus 7 Series ISRs?

A. No. C880G Plus 7 Series routers support encapsulation slip by default.

Q. What is Direct IP on C880G Plus 7 Series ISRs?

A. C880G Series routers are integrated with a Sierra Wireless MC8705 cellular modem that is running under Direct IP mode to maintain HSPA+ data throughput. Direct IP is a Sierra Wireless proprietary framing protocol used to transfer data between the host platform and the modem. Direct IP framed data have a dedicated USB connection, meaning the host can still send AT commands after the direct IP data session is established. Cisco IOS Software sets encapsulation to SLIP based on the data link protocol between the host and the modem.

Q. What WLAN antenna options are available for C880W Series ISRs?

A. All C880W Series routers embed three dual-band 2.4- or 5-GHz Planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA)-type omnidirectional antennae. External swivel-mount dipole antennae are no longer used. Antennae are attached to the cover of the chassis and covered by the front bezel, and U.FL-type RF connectors attach to the radio.

Q. Do the Cisco 880 WLAN Series routers have removable WLAN antennae?

A. Only Cisco 881 WLAN Series routers have removable swivel-mount dipole antennae. Other products in these routers have captive default dipole antennae. Removal of them and support for other types of external WLAN antenna is not supported by Cisco.

More info from http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/collateral/routers/800-series-routers/qa_c67_458826.html

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What Changes We can Expect from Cisco in 2017

June 13 2017 , Written by Cisco & Cisco Router, Network Switch Published on #Networking, #Cisco News, #IT, #Data Center, #Technology, #Cisco Technology - IT News

For all kinds of customers, what can they expect from Cisco in 2017? In the following article, Zeus Kerravala (the founder and principal analyst with ZK Research, and provides a mix of tactical advice to help his clients in the current business climate.) listed the main points that users and clients expect from Cisco in 2017.

  • Cisco will take a chunk of the security market. The security market is easily the most fragmented of all of the IT submarkets. It’s currently a $75 billion market, with no single vendor having anywhere close to double-digit share. Cisco, in particular, has fumbled around in security for years with different initiatives and architectures that have been ineffective.

    Times are different today. As I pointed out in an earlier post, Cisco has never been positioned better in the security industry, and the company is finally using its greatest asset—its dominance in the network—to create tangible differentiation. Look for 2017 to be the year it breaks away from the competition and takes a chunk of the security share.
  • Cisco breaks away in collaboration. Collaboration at Cisco has had its ups and downs over the past few years, but the company now pointed in the right direction. Spark was launched as a Slack-like team collaboration tool, but in actuality, it’s much more than that. It’s a fully integrated cloud, hardware and software experience that can deliver seamless, easy-to-use experiences on a mobile phone, desktop or meeting room. Expect Cisco to continue to innovate around Spark and create its next wave of growth in collaboration.
  • The data center gets a shot in the arm with an acquisition. The Unified Computing System (UCS) carried the data center business unit at Cisco for years. Recently, though, the growth of the product has slowed. In fact, this past quarter saw the data center revenue fall 3 percent.

    UCS is a great product, but the compute industry is shifting to hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI). Cisco’s current offering, HyperFlex, is an OEM from SpringPath, and channel feedback has been that they would prefer Cisco to own the product rather than OEM it. The OEM allows Cisco to dip its toe in the water, and in 2017 Cisco will jump in with both feet by acquiring SpringPath, which will stimulate data center growth.
  • Expect Cisco to focus on analytics. When one thinks of analytics, the name Cisco is rarely top of mind. However, analytics is becoming a core component of Cisco’s strategy. Not only is it at the core of the recently announced Tetration product, but it is also fundamental to the company’s differentiation in security, Internet of Things, network operations and collaboration. Expect to see Cisco do more analytics on more network data to differentiate its offering from the many smaller competitors that can’t match its footprint.
  • Cisco will push its engineer base to learn new skills. Markets transition. That’s a fact. And when then do, the engineers who work with the technology need to change their skills. Most vendors don’t see the transition, won’t admit its happening or don’t want to upset their engineer base by forcing them to change. And that always ends up being a disaster.

    Think of engineers who worked with mainframes, Token Ring, TDM voice, SNA and other trends. Most are gone, as are the vendors that sold the stuff.

    One of Cisco’s competitive advantages is its huge base of engineers, many of whom are steeped in the way networking was done. Based on my discussions with Cisco executives, including Jeanne Dunn, who runs Cisco’s learning group, I believe Cisco wants to disrupt its engineer base and have them learn new skills—such as automation, data sciences, programming and business skills. Some won’t like the changes to the certification requirements, but the fact is Cisco engineers need to start developing skills for the digital era.
  • Executive churn will slow down. Since Robbins took the helm, there has been a steady churn at the executive level, including Kelly Ahuja, Rob Soderberry and the famed “MPLS” group—just to name a few.

    I believe Robbins’ team is set now. And while there might be the odd departure here and there, this is the team he’s going to run with.

    One question I’ve been asked is if the company would replace the recently departed CTO Zorawar Biri Singh. I believe engineering is in the best hands they can be under the co-leadership of Rowan Trollope (IoT and applications) and David Goeckeler (networking and security), and the structure will stay as is. Get used to the faces at the top; they should be sticking around for a while.

One thing that will remain the same at Cisco is the company’s commitment to changing the world. Cisco’s former CEO, John Chambers, had a great desire to have Cisco make the world a better place. As I pointed out earlier this year, Robbins has picked up the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) ball and is running with it faster than ever.

The world is becoming increasingly digitized, and many of the digital enablers—such as IoT, cloud and mobility—are network centric. The coming year presents Cisco a great opportunity to flex its enormous networking muscles and move into the next wave of growth.

The original article from http://www.networkworld.com/article/3148784/lan-wan/what-to-expect-from-cisco-in-2017.html

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